Saturated Fats

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Quiz: Do You Understand Saturated Fats?

Test your knowledge by answering the following questions:

Questions
True
False
1

Having high triglycerides can increase your risk of heart disease and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome.

Explanation:
While your body does need some triglycerides for energy, having high triglycerides can increase your risk of heart disease and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome. Causes of high triglycerides include obesity, kidney disease, hypothyroidism, poorly-controlled diabetes and certain medications.
2

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats raise bad cholesterol (LDL) levels in your blood.

Explanation:
Different types of fat have different effects on your cholesterol levels. Saturated fats and trans fats raise bad cholesterol (LDL) levels in your blood, while monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats can lower them.
3

Foods that say “0 trans fat” are a healthy option.

Explanation:
Most nutritionists recommend replacing saturated fats and trans fats with monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats. Pay attention to labels when you’re shopping. Don’t be fooled by foods that say “0 trans fat,” as they can contain a lot of saturated fats and/or be high in added sugars.
4

If you want to lower your LDL cholesterol levels, you can increase your intake of omega 3 fats.

Explanation:
If you've been diagnosed with high LDL cholesterol or you're just trying to make more heart healthy choices, there are several things you can do with your diet, in particular, lowering your dietary saturated fat. You can do that by aiming for lower-fat animal products, adding nuts and seeds to your diet, limiting egg yolks to two per week and eating more vegetarian meals. You can increase your intake of omega 3 fats.
5

Fat helps keep us warm.

Explanation:
Fat is essential in our diet, helping us absorb nutrients, gain energy, keep us warm and support cell growth.